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The anti-diet movement urges people to reject restrictive diets and embrace self love and acceptance around weight. An investigation by The Washington Post and Examination found that large food companies were recruiting anti-diet influencers to promote sugary cereals and processed food.

Olha Khorimarko /Getty Images


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Olha Khorimarko /Getty Images

The anti-diet movement urges people to reject restrictive diets and embrace self love and acceptance around weight. An investigation by The Washington Post and Examination found that large food companies were recruiting anti-diet influencers to promote sugary cereals and processed food.

Olha Khorimarko /Getty Images

In recent years, the body positivity movement has raised it’s profile, especially on social media largely through self-described anti-diet and body positivity influencers.

These influencers and others like them represent a pivot away from the diet and fitness culture embodied by companies like weight watchers, which focuses on losing weight as a path to healthier living.

Today there is a broad « anti-diet » movement that posits that bodies can be healthy at any size. But some are trying to co-opt this movement.

An investigation by The Washington Post and the Examination found that large food companies are recruiting these influencers to promote sugary cereals and processed snacks.

As people who are part of the anti-diet movement saw an opportunity to practice and spread a message of self-love and acceptance, big food companies saw an opportunity to make money.

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This episode was produced by Marc Rivers and Kathryn Fink

It was edited by Courtney Dorning and Christopher Intagliata.

Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.